19 May

Lessons From The Motherland

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My parents shortly before escaping communist Czechoslovakia

My parents had three children under the age of four when they escaped communist Czechoslovakia over 40 years ago.  They somehow managed to get a three-day visa to “visit” Austria, so they packed what would be considered reasonable for a three-day trip and never came back.

Needless to say, it’s been a long three days.

Many of their siblings also escaped to various countries: Austria, Germany, Canada. Others never left.

And so last week, we journeyed back in the other direction.  My entire extended family gathered for a reunion, bringing together the Canadian, German, Austrian, and Czech branches of the family for the first time ever.

I had grown up with stories of what it was like to be a refugee, navigating a  bewildering new language and culture.  I knew how hard my parents had to work in order to provide an education for their kids so that we could have a brighter future.

But last week was my first time hearing stories of what it was like to stay.  Because while my parents escaped to a better life, their siblings felt obligated to remain and take care of aging parents.  “Well, SOMEONE had to stay”, they said.

Not only that, the communist regime made them pay a price for having relatives who fled.  Those left behind were only allowed to have menial jobs and their kids were refused a higher education … which meant the next generation was left with these same jobs too.

Frankly, I had never given much thought to the experience of my relatives in the mother country.  I had only ever heard one narrative.  One set of experiences.  

But hearing these stories for the first time last week gave me an understanding of how the actions of one person affected others in our interdependent web of relationships and lives.

Guess what … it’s often the same where enterprise software is concerned. Here too, we tend to listen to only one set of experiences. Usually, it’s the experiences of whomever is signing the checks.

Many points of view
Enterprise software usually has multiple sets of users.

For example, with an expense reporting system, there might be…

… a CFO and department heads who want better visibility into how their company is spending money.

… an IT manager who can greenlight the technical feasibility of a project.

… the people who actually use the system, day in and day out.

But guess whose voice is most often heard?  If you said the CFO and department heads (who write the checks) and the IT manager (who needs to make it all work), you are correct!

Left behind are those who do the actual work. Nobody listens to their stories, leaving them to make the best of systems and technology that were designed and/or approved by people far away from the day-to-day, hands-on operation.

At the risk of hyperbole, we might think of them as your company’s “forgotten cousins,” left behind and standing in breadlines.

With that in mind, here is your homework for next week:

Have a conversation with someone who actually uses what you make.  If you build technology that is used by nurses, talk to nurses, not just the hospital administrators.

Watch how they use the technology. Is it smooth and intuitive or have they developed workarounds?  Does it make their lives easier, or do they simply put up with what’s been given to them? Ask a lot of “Why questions” [link to previous article]. Listen. Hear their story.

Along the way, be gently resolute with the decision makers – the ones you already talk to – and insist on meeting with their team members who are being asked to use your system.

Will you encounter resistance when you try to do this? Most definitely. But persist. I guarantee that you will end up with a better product.  Which, after all, was the reason you began your journey in the first place.

 

07 May

3 Big Ideas for B2B Product People: Mairi Miller from Nanometrics

MairiMillerAs Head of Corporate Marketing at Nanometrics, Mairi’s done some pretty interesting stuff when it comes to understanding her customers.  Beginning with the creation of a “Customer Experience Taskforce,” she found ways to gather deep insights about the difficulties her customers — mostly scientists measuring shifts in the earth — face daily. From there, she focused on how Nanometrics could improve their experience.

Here’s what she had to say:

  1. Even smart customers appreciate user friendly products
    We first formed the Customer Experience Taskforce because we felt distanced from our customers — we were designing products for people that we hardly knew. We decided to do a bunch of in-person interviews to get to know them better, and the results were astounding.

    One interview stands out in particular: We talked to a group of scientists that had just returned from the South Pole. These folks had had a less-than-stellar experience with our equipment, but not for the reason we expected!

    The equipment itself worked perfectly. The pain point was in actually deploying the equipment and setting it up. We’d assumed that these scientists, as smart as they were, would have the same technical know-how that a group of engineers would. Not so — they were experts in reading the data, not in how our tools worked.

    From these interviews, we realized there was a large gap in our offering when it came to giving scientists a user-friendly experience. We also uncovered a brand new opportunity for expanding our business by offering installation services and engineering expertise.

  2. To influence change, focus on the preexisting pain points within your own company.

    As a marketer, it became obvious to me that we could learn a lot from an in-depth, intentional study of our customer base. But part of the struggle was convincing everyone else internally — engineers and C-suite alike — that the project would be worthwhile.

    Eventually, we found that we could make our case for forming the Customer Experience Taskforce most effectively by framing it in terms of a pain point the company was already experiencing. We decided to focus on a somewhat recently released product that was underperforming, and aimed our pitch to our executive staff around getting customer feedback in order to improve sales.

    The response was fantastic. Instead of a resource-sucking side project, the taskforce was now directly in line with an existing company initiative.

  3. Data is only meaningful when aggregated; and presentation style matters.

    When you interview people, especially scientists, you end up gathering a ton of feedback. I mean, a ton. And it’s messy, too — not all of it will fit nicely into buckets, and aggregating it into something useful can be tricky.

    As we began collecting data, we started to get very excited about what we were finding. But, we had to wait to share it with the team — we knew that sharing the raw data would be overwhelming and potentially misleading to others that weren’t looking at all the findings at once.

    Despite the eagerness of others in the company, we decided to keep our findings confidential until we could present them all at once. I’m glad we did. We were able to curate the most powerful stories and the most impactful feedback, and deliver it all in one cohesive presentation that contributed to repositioning our company from a product manufacturer to one that offers services, too.

 

Powerful stuff! (And we’re talking about earthquakes here, so the bar is high!) I had one more question for Mairi, of course: “Dr. Strange or Dr. Who?”

I loved Mairi’s answer: “I never saw Dr. Strange, but Dr. Who creeped me out as a kid! Now, Lord of the Rings and Star Wars, those are my favorites!”

Fair enough! See you next month.